Tag Archives: public assistance

Pondering The Auto Bailout

A CNN research poll showed that 61% of Americans oppose a government bailout for the U.S. auto industry:

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — A majority of Americans oppose a bailout of the troubled U.S. auto industry, according to a poll released Wednesday.

The CNN/Opinion Research Corp. poll, conducted by telephone on Dec. 1-2 with nearly 1,100 people, showed that 61% of those surveyed oppose government assistance for the major U.S. automakers.

[…]

A full 70% of respondents indicated that a bailout is unfair to taxpayers.

In addition to being unfair, the poll showed that a majority of those surveyed think a bailout would not help the economy.

CNNMoney.com

Before I say another word, I want to make clear that I am not claiming any kind of expertise in the area of economics. I wonder, though, if a simple, common-sense approach to this might be in order.

Let’s begin with the the concern that a government bailout of the auto industry would be unfair to taxpayers. I wonder if the people who oppose the bailout on these grounds have considered the 3,000,000 (three million) people who make up the auto industry. That’s 3,000,000 more people out of work!

Will those who are claiming that a bailout would be unfair to taxpayers be OK with those 3,000,000 people putting their children on Medicaid, receiving food stamps and government funded housing assistance, and a variety of other forms of government aid — all of which is funded by taxpayers?

For those who are concerned about the fairness to taxpayers, doesn’t it make more sense to support a one-time bailout which will keep 3,000,000 people working, out of the unemployment and “welfare” lines so that they have more to put back into the economy?

Yes, the economy. That’s the other concern. In addition to a bailout being unfair to taxpayers, those opposing it also think that it would not help the economy.

And putting 3,000,000 people out of work will?

Like I’ve already said, I’m certainly no expert on the subject. But I don’t think it takes an economic genius to figure out that putting 3,000,000 people out of work can’t be “fair” to taxpayers or good for the economy.

Am I missing something, or have these people not thought this through very well? Sure, there need to be restrictions and conditions on any sort of bailout. But, in the bigger picture, doesn’t it make more sense and benefit all sides to keep the auto industry moving and 3,000,000 people working?

As always, I welcome any and all feedback.

Posted by Lottie — Copyright © 2008 Rambling On


Forgiveness According To David Jordan

My old pal, David Jordan (DJ) has written a lovely post on forgiveness. It might also sound like he had a heart, if I didn’t keep hearing the words “lazy class” in my head as I read it. Let me show you what I mean:

The point Jesus is making here is that those who have been forgiven of a debt they could have never payed have absolutely no right to demand ‘payment’ from others. The one who has been forgiven the unfathomable cannot demand the miniscule. Instead, he should, out of a heart of pure thankfulness, freely let go of the debts (wrongs) incurred by others.

To forgive means to release someone from a debt- the debt of your expectations.

And yet he can’t forgive people the debt of accepting public assistance because, he says, they are taking something from him. I would think a few scraps of public assistance (even if taking it is wrong) would be the “minuscule” here. By DJ’s own statement, he should forgive, and release the debt of his own expectations.

Even if people are collecting public assistance (taking from DJ) because they’re lazy, he has no right to expect apologies or repayment or anything, for that matter. After all, DJ has been forgiven the unfathomable, and out of pure thankfulness for that he should freely let go of the debt (wrongs) incurred by the people who are “taking from him” (wronging him) by accepting public assistance.

In Matthew 6, Christ shows us how to pray (The Lord’s Prayer) and in this prayer, we find the phrase, “…forgive us our debts, as we have also forgiven our debtors.” This is huge!!! We are asking God the Father to forgive us our shortcomings ACCORDING TO how we forgive others. How can we ask God for mercy if we are not showing mercy? How can we ask God for grace and not show that same grace to those who have wronged us?

Can DJ be forgiven his shortcomings when he hasn’t let go of being “wronged” by people who “take from him” by accepting public assistance? How can he expect mercy from God when he shows no mercy toward those he calls the “lazy class”? By DJ’s own statement and his own doctrine, he dare not even ask for it:

When it comes to expecting apologies, Christians don’t have a leg to stand on, for the only reason they stand at all is the imputed righteousness of Christ. All we can do is forgive and release the debt. How dare we expect apologies after such a debt has been lifted from us?

And yet he exhibits relentless bitterness toward those members of the so-called “lazy class” because he believes they are taking from him. He refuses to forgive and release them of their ‘debt’.

What can all this mean for David Jordan?

Posted by Lottie — Copyright © 2008 Rambling On


The Lazy Class

Besides the one I wrote about here, another one of D.J.’s posts keeps showing up in My Comments.

In this one he outlines what he believes to be Barack Obama’s socialist agenda:

1. Give an immediate $250 to ‘workers and their families’.
2. Give an immediate $250 to seniors for whatever reason.
3. Give another $250 to ‘workers and seniors’ if the economy worsens.
4. Give money to (aka Provide relief for) homeowners hit by the housing crisis.
5. Create a $10 billion foreclosure fund for irresponsible homeowners.
6. Create an mortgage interest credit (negative tax) only for ‘low-income’ workers.
7. Ensure freedom to unionize (form unions)
8. Provide UNIVERSAL HEALTH CARE COVERAGE by providing the ‘average’ family a $2500 reduction in premiums.
9. Make college ‘affordable’ by providing $4000 tax credit (read ‘tax redistribution’)
10. Tackle ‘concentrated poverty’ in America.
11. Increase the supply of affordable housing (read Government housing)
12. Give every American a $1000 personal check for his/her vote in November. (OK, I made the last one up, but it sure fits the pattern!)

I’m not going to argue whether or not this is a socialist agenda; I don’t want to explain socialism to yet another ignorant fool. No, what I take issue with is this:

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